Stan Firm inna Inglan: Black Diaspora in London, 1960-70s
Apr
7
8:00pm 8:00pm

Stan Firm inna Inglan: Black Diaspora in London, 1960-70s

In conversation with selected artists responding to the display.

Explore the experience of those who travelled from the Caribbean and West Africa to live in London

This display brings together works from the 1960s and 1970s by eight photographers who documented Black communities in London: Raphael Albert, Bandele ‘Tex’ Ajetunmobi, James Barnor, Colin Jones, Neil Kenlock, Dennis Morris, Syd Shelton and Al Vandenberg

The photographs reveal the many and varied experiences of individuals who travelled from the Caribbean region and West Africa to live in London, from everyday family life to political engagement. They show people as they respond to, react against and move beyond the racial tension and exclusion that were part of life for Black communities in the British capital. The title of the display, ‘Stan Firm inna Inglan’, is taken from the poem It Dread inna Inglan by Linton Kwesi Johnson, who in the 1970s gave a voice and poetic form to the Afro-Caribbean diaspora and its resistance in the face of racism. The poem expresses in Jamaican patois (creole) the resolve of African, Asian and Caribbean immigrants to ‘stand firm in England’, asserting the determination of Black British communities to remain in Britain and declare it as their rightful home.

The work of most of the photographers has gained prominence in recent years through the research and curatorial work of Autograph ABP, which was established in London in 1988 to advocate the inclusion of historically marginalised photographic practices.

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Moonlight: Screening and Panel Discussion at Gal-dem V&A Friday late
Feb
25
1:00pm 1:00pm

Moonlight: Screening and Panel Discussion at Gal-dem V&A Friday late

Stratford Picturehouse

Moonlight: Screening and Panel Discussion
Stratford Picturehouse
12.00
Please note this activity is ticketed. Buy tickets via Stratford Picturehouse box office.
Join us for a special matinee screening of Barry Jenkin's Oscar nominated film, Moonlight plus an exclusive sneak peek of 195 Lewis, a new series about being black, queer and polyamorous in New York City by Chanelle Aponte Pearson. The film will be followed by a panel discussion with Dionne Edwards, Joy Gharoro-Akpojotor, chaired by Emma Dabiri.
@TheDiasporaDiva | @Dionceknowledge | @JoyGharoro

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 Preview: Hidden Figures + discussion  An inspiring true story about the women who made the NASA space programme possible.
Feb
7
to Feb 8

Preview: Hidden Figures + discussion An inspiring true story about the women who made the NASA space programme possible.

 

Hidden Figures

Meet the brains behind some of the US’ greatest achievements of the 1960’s Space Race. Based on an untold true story, the film follow genius mathematician Katherine Johnson (Henson) and her equally brilliant colleagues Dorothy Vaughan (Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Monáe) as they work at NASA as real-life computers, hoping to catch up with the Soviets.

Speakers taking part in the discussion will be writer and broadcaster Emma Dabiri, director and experience designer Nelly Ben Hayoun and director Jenn Nkiru. Hosted by Clare Stewart, BFI Head of Festivals.

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SPEAKER: WOW Women of the World Festival 2016 "Stop Touching My Hair: Black Feminisms in Popular Culture"
Mar
13
4:00pm 4:00pm

SPEAKER: WOW Women of the World Festival 2016 "Stop Touching My Hair: Black Feminisms in Popular Culture"

What does the portrayal of black women in popular culture tell us about race, sex and power? Join journalist and campaigner Reni Eddo-Lodge, visual sociologist Emma Dabiri, activist Becky Olaniyi and playwrite Adura Onashile as they discuss the joys and challenges of being a black feminist. 

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SPEAKER: Power and the Gaze: Meteor Performing Arts Festival in Bergen Norway
Oct
19
7:00am 7:00am

SPEAKER: Power and the Gaze: Meteor Performing Arts Festival in Bergen Norway

Emma Dabiri looks at the visuality of race and beauty underpinned by feminist theory and methodologies in her contribution "Look, a Negro".

Fresh and artistically daring international theatre festival.
METEOR is held every second year by BIT Teatergarasjen, and presents exciting performances by national and international artists and groups.

10 days with performances, installations, workshops and seminars from many different performing arts companies. 

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PANELIST: Watermelon Woman - Reel Good Film Club
Sep
13
6:00pm 6:00pm

PANELIST: Watermelon Woman - Reel Good Film Club

Cheryl is a part time video shop worker and part time aspiring filmmaker. She knows she wants to make a film about black women ‘because our stories have never been told’ and is baffled by the lack of black women in film. When watching ‘Plantation Memories’, Cheryl is drawn to one particular ‘mammie’ whom is merely credited as ‘Watermelon Woman’. Cheryl’s embarks on an investigation to to tell this woman’s story and as she digs deeper she begins to explore her own identity, from her sexuality to the value of her artistry.

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PANELIST: Afroisms - Many Ways of Being One
Sep
12
3:15pm 3:15pm

PANELIST: Afroisms - Many Ways of Being One

International shorts programme exploring the spectrum of Black subjectivity through the lenses of distinct subcultures from the Afropunk and the Afrofuturist to the Afropolitan and the Black Dandy. The programme will be followed by a panel discussion with experts exploring and debating the key polemics within these cultures and asking how far the dogma of the ism can truly define us.

'Afroisms I ' brings together the Afropolitan saupers in downtown Soweto with the artists and designers on the shores of Dakar, Afropunk's latest offering - Queer Hip Hop from the sidewalks of New York and Afrofuturist Odysseys into the heart of the diaspora.

Our globetrotting film programme explores the full range of black subjectivity as it is today and has always been - vibrant, polemic, creative and diverse. The discussion that follows with get to the heart of these distinct subcultures and ask: how far can the dogma of isms define us? Can the hyper-hetro-masculine Hip-Hop arena make space for the Queer voice? Has the value of the Afropolitan been underestimated?

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PANELIST: She's Beautiful When She's Angry
Aug
21
6:30pm 6:30pm

PANELIST: She's Beautiful When She's Angry

She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry resurrects the buried history of the outrageous, often brilliant women who founded the modern women’s movement from 1966 to 1971. The film takes us from the founding of NOW, with ladies in hats and gloves, to the emergence of more radical factions of women’s liberation; from intellectuals like Kate Millett to the street theatrics of W.I.T.C.H. (Women’s International Conspiracy from Hell!). Artfully combining dramatizations, performance and archival imagery, the film recounts the stories of women who fought for their own equality, and in the process created a worldwide revolution.

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LECTURER: Who Stole All The Black Women from Britain - Queen Nzingha lectures
Jun
27
6:00pm 6:00pm

LECTURER: Who Stole All The Black Women from Britain - Queen Nzingha lectures

Here in the UK, the visibility of Black women in representations of mainstream Black British culture is such that you might be forgiven for thinking we are an endangered species. The near erasure of Black British women from this terrain, which is in the main dominated by black men and white women, is rarely commented upon, despite its prominence. What, asks sociologist Emma Dabiri, is actually going on here?

 

In this illustrated Queen Nzingha  talk we will unpack some of the processes wherein Black British women are rendered invisible, and the ways in which this can be read as part of what Ms Dabiri identifies as a three tiered assault on Black British life.

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PAPER: Why I am (still) not an Afropolitan African Futures and Beyond: Visions in Transition - African Literature Association Conference
Jun
3
to Jun 6

PAPER: Why I am (still) not an Afropolitan African Futures and Beyond: Visions in Transition - African Literature Association Conference

From June 3rd – June 6th, 2015, the 41st Annual Conference of the African Literature Association (ALA) will take place at Bayreuth University/Germany. Scholars from all around the globe are invited to discuss latest developments in studies on African and African-diasporic literature and media, framed by the overarching topic “African Futures and Beyond. Visions in Transition”. These pages will provide you with all relevant information.

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SPEAKER: Tedx UCL Talks Momentum
May
28
2:00pm 2:00pm

SPEAKER: Tedx UCL Talks Momentum

Why I can’t believe this is happening in 2015 (insert year of choice) is meaningless”

On Thursday 28th May, there will be hundreds of TEDxWomen events taking place around the world, all of which will be celebrating the theme ‘Momentum’, in conjunction with TEDWomen in America. We at TEDxUCLWomen, will be part of this movement. TEDxUCLWomen is an all-day event , which in addition to live streaming a session of TEDWomen from California, will feature 3 of our own independently curated sessions, filled with incredible speakers.

 

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PANELIST: Untangling the Politics of Black Hair - New Art Exchange Nottingham
Nov
22
12:00pm12:00pm

PANELIST: Untangling the Politics of Black Hair - New Art Exchange Nottingham

How do you wear your hair? Why?

Does popular culture propagate an unrealistic, Eurocentric ideal of beauty?

What impact is this having on young people today?


NAE hosts a panel discussion chaired by Hannah Pool, Chair of UKFeminista, published author and journalist (The Guardian, The Times, Grazia.) Taking the political and cultural significance of black hair as our starting point, the panel – artists, cultural commentators, academics and activists – will discuss the relationship between hair and post-colonialist beauty ideals, and the impact this has had on perceptions of identity. Local young people will lead a discussion around how popular culture is influencing the next generation's sense of self-worth. The event will also explore how we can begin to eradicate negative reinforcement and promote positive experiences. Join us to share your views and play a key part in moving the debate forward. Further panel members will be announced soon.

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CHAIR: Imagining Future Africa: Sci Fi, Innovation and Technology
Jul
13
4:30pm 4:30pm

CHAIR: Imagining Future Africa: Sci Fi, Innovation and Technology

n recent years, Africa’s engagement with technology and innovation has exploded. From telephone banking to the development of cargo drone routes, Africa is coming up with ideas and tech solutions that could be applied to the rest of the world. But what is in store for the future? The rich and complex field of contemporary African science fiction may hold the key to some of the answers. Focusing on African sci fi, speculative and fantasy writing, this panel will explore literature’s relationship to innovation and technology. How are African writers imagining their own futures and how do their visions align with those of scientists and technology entrepreneurs? What do their stories tell us about the continent’s future? What narratives and themes are emerging? And how do these relate to ancestral cultures and traditional systems of thought and story-telling? Join us to discuss our bold manifesto for Future Africa!

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PANELIST: Untangling the Politics of Black Hair - IntelligenceSq
May
29
7:00pm 7:00pm

PANELIST: Untangling the Politics of Black Hair - IntelligenceSq

Straight, braided or afro – black hair speaks volumes. The Williams sisters were encouraged by their parents to have braided hair, not a weave; Michelle Obama’s bangs inspired countless column inches; Oprah rocked a 3.5lb afro wig, but not the real thing. And then there’s Beyoncé who has been known to restyle her hair nine times in a day. Usually seen with a fabulous blow-out, she recently shared a new picture of herself rocking the curls she was born with.

Some argue that the black woman who straightens her hair is being untrue to herself. But is that really so different from a brunette dyeing her hair blonde? And is a black woman who wears her hair naturally – as more and more black people do nowadays – a sign of rebellion against the pressure to conform? Or should the debate be brought to an end and hair just allowed to be hair?

In this discussion, we explored the complicated decision-making process black women face when it comes to hair.

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Feb
19
7:00pm 7:00pm

PANELIST: Black (Mis) Representation- Mainstream feminism and Black Feminism; mainstream representations of Black Women; Colourism, Black Masculinity

Brought to you by the SOAS Women Society, 'Ain't I A Woman? What’s race got to do with it?' will explore the intersectionality of gender and race in a week-long series of events centred around Ntozake Shange's play 'For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf.’

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CONTRIBUTER: I am Nobody’s Nigga BBC Radio 4 Conversation with poet Dean Atta
Oct
3
11:30am11:30am

CONTRIBUTER: I am Nobody’s Nigga BBC Radio 4 Conversation with poet Dean Atta

In January 2012 Dean Atta caused an online stir with his poem written as a response to the conviction of Stephen Lawrence's killers, questioning the use of racist language and whether it could ever be reclaimed by black people.

In this programme, Dean interrogates his viewpoint on one of the most controversial words in the English language, as the debate around its place on the streets, in music and in popular culture refuses to go away.

The title of Dean Atta's poem was "I am Nobody's Nigger". It became the title of his debut poetry collection - and also his calling card. Focusing on his own experience in the UK, Dean has a series of conversations with young people, academics, activists, rappers and his peers to compare contemporary reactions to the "N-word". Dean meets former Black Panther Darcus Howe, sociologist Emma Dabiri, the rapper TY, the comedian Reginald D Hunter, fellow poet Inua Ellams and the DJs at youth radio station Reprezent 107.3FM to discover that, in 2013, 'nigger' is still a word provoking complicated and emotive debate.

Why is Dean so uncomfortable using it, when many of those around him aren't? What do we understand of its history? Can it ever be reclaimed or de-fanged?

In these personal and sometimes challenging encounters, Dean is asked to consider the motivation behind his provocative poem and whether his opinion has changed since writing it.

Produced by Rebecca Maxted and Tom Whalley.
A Wise Buddah production for BBC Radio 4.

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